Life in Panama

I have an article in the latest issue of Global Living Magazine 

(it’s free to download!)

Inside this issue:

– Steps With Therra: Thailand’s first social enterprise providing vocational training to adults with learning disabilities

– Building cultural competency in the workforce

– An International Education

– Finding Purpose & Passion as an Expat Partner

– Expat Life in Panama – All about Amelia and Greg’s new adventure

– Life as an Expat in Valencia, Spain

– Expat Books

… and much more!

 

LIFE IN CHINA WITH ITALIAN FLAVOR

Parsley & Coriander is a new novel by Antonella Moretti. It was originally published in Italian and has just been released in English.

The story gives us a peek into the lives of a group Italian women living in China over the course of a year.

Luisella left a good job in Italy to follow her husband to Asia. She has a 12 year old daughter in the International school who now speaks perfect English. As the story begins, Luisella has been living in China for several years. She has re-invented herself and is now a blogger and writer. She is in the process of publishing her first book. She enjoys her life in China and is the go-to person for the group. In a way she is a mother figure. She takes the time to help those in need and tries to engage the ones that are lost.

Astrid is a newcomer with two small children. Her husband arrived six months earlier and she found it difficult to take care of the children on her own. She was happy to be reunited with her husband but very anxious about her new environment. Luckily she makes friends and has a very supportive husband. Her best friend turns out to be a Malaysian woman and at the end they venture out into the countryside to see another side of China.

Emma, on the other hand, arrives hoping to save her marriage. Big mistake. It only goes from bad to worse, but her outcome is the most surprising of all, even to her.

Other women are weaved into the story. Some need to resolve medical issues, others have trouble with their children, some don’t adjust at all and return home, and some are highly successful. One young woman is there to study Chinese language and culture and wants to immerse herself completely. They make fun of her and say it isn’t possible. She proves them wrong.

We see an ugly side of expat life when we meet the unhappy women who hate everything about their host country and are very cliquish. But mostly they support each other and grow and learn from their experience.

The author, through Luisella’s character, emphasizes the opportunity they all have to experience and learn about a new culture. The children attend the International School and speak fluent English as well as have friends from all over the world. She also recognizes that her child is constantly saying good bye to people and adjusting so there is a down side but overall the outcome is a positive one.

This is a good glimpse into the trials and tribulations of a trailing spouse. Anybody living in China or moving to China would benefit from reading this book. 

You can read Antonella’s blog at Parsley and Coriander.

 

Frolicking with Friends in South Beach

I flew into Miami on a Thursday afternoon and headed over to a friend’s house in Coral Gables. She lives just down the block from the Biltmore and the Venetian Pool. People continued to arrive all afternoon and evening. Old friends gathering for one of our yearly reunions. Lots of good food and drink and hugs. 

The Biltmore

The Biltmore originally opened in 1926 as the Miami Biltmore Country Club and included an 18-hole golf course, polo fields, tennis courts, a large swimming pool, along with a 400-room hotel. It has gone through some changes over the years and was even a hospital during World War II. It remained a Veterans Administration hospital until 1968. It sat unoccupied until 1983 when the City of Coral Gables started its restoration. The Biltmore re-opened in 1987 as a four star hotel and resort. In 1996, the National Register of Historic Places designated it a National Historic Landmark.

The Venetian Pool was created in 1923 from a coral rock quarry. Its 820,000 gallon pool is fed with spring water from an underground aquifer. There are two waterfalls and caves that you can swim in and out of. The pool is also on the National Register of Historic Places. It was originally called the Venetian Casino and frequented by celebrities including Johnny Weismuller and Esther Williams. At times the pool would be emptied of its 820,000 gallons of water and orchestras would perform on the pool bottom. 

Inside the limo

 

 

 

The next morning we gathered in South Beach to catch our stretch limo that took us to Vizcaya.

 

 

 

Vizcaya was built by International Harvester Vice President James Deering of Chicago, IL. It was originally 180 acres with the main house, the gardens, the farm, and the waterfront. The house itself is fashioned after an Italian villa, or many Italian villas. Each room was built to accommodate the furniture Mr Deering had purchased on his trips to Italy. The furnishings determined ceiling height and door width. The main house opened in 1916 and the gardens were finished in 1922. Deering died in 1925 so he didn’t have long to enjoy his creation. It passed on to his brother and his brother’s children and in 1952 they donated it to Dade County.

The main house has 34 rooms with over 2,500 art objects and furnishings. The gardens contain 2,000 specimens and 25 acres of endangered primary growth forests. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1995. Besides attracting 200,000 visitors a year, it also serves as a diplomatic seat for Miami-Date County where presidents and foreign dignitaries are entertained. It has hosted Pope John Paul II and major events such as the Summit of the Americas and the signing of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas.

Back in the limo on the way to our lunch destination we popped the champagne and all had a glass. We spent the afternoon on the River eating seafood. It seems like mostly what we do is eat and drink.

That night we hit a taco place that was amazing – Taquiza. It was a small order at the counter/take out place where they made their own blue corn tortillas and fried them up for chips to order accompanied by very fresh guacamole or pico de gallo. I would highly recommend it if you are in the area.

Next day it was a late start with staggered breakfast. I joined the group who ended up at the beach but another group went to eat crab at Joe’s Stone Crab. It was originally started by Joe Weiss in 1913 as a lunch counter.  Nobody knew you could even eat stone crabs. In 1921 a Harvard ichthyologist doing research asked if Joe ever served stone crabs. The bay was full of them. They experimented a bit and decided to boil them. They ended up serving them chilled and cracked with hash browns, cole slaw and mayonnaise. Joe’s became a destination for any celebrity who visited the area. From Al Capone to the Duchess of Windsor. Stone crabs are seasonal and it was the last weekend they would be available. Everybody from our group came back raving about the food and overall experience.

 

 

The beach was nice too. But it was crowded.

 

 

 

 

That night we had a party to go to. Our friend Leo was working as the official photographer. So we got dressed up and headed out to Smith and Wollensky at the southernmost tip of South Beach. It sits next to the 17 acre South Pointe Park. We had a small room overlooking the water. The food was amazing. Crab cake sandwiches, sliders, lamb chops, flat bread pizza, bruschetta, turkey and gravy, and an open bar. Yum. There was another party next to us and one of our group swears he saw Ivana Trump there. 

We all met for brunch at Loews the next morning. It was kind of chaotic trying to herd everybody over there and find a table or tables to accommodate us but we all managed to get fed and then have our round of hugs and kisses bidding all a farewell. 

Until next time.

 

 

Five years of blogging

I just passed my five year mark as a blogger. This was my first post in March of 2012:

My New Mantra

“Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.”
The Matterhorn
I stole this photo from my brother who lives in Switzerland and happened to be passing this particular mountain among others on some weekend trip of his.
He is returning to the US soon and will also be an Alien….
It kind of represents my new mantra.  There are probably some trails up there for people to follow.
I spent two lovely years in Switzerland myself.  Fun times.  More on that later.
 
Since then I published my memoir on growing up internationally. I wrote over 300 posts and had about 50,000 visitors. Plus I blogged at the Baltimore Post Examiner for several years with more posts and visitors. I wrote a cookbook. I traveled to Switzerland, Italy, Nova Scotia, Florida, California, Colorado, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, New York and Minnesota. I buried my son’s father. I loved and lost. I quit my job. I packed up my things and moved to a new city. I found a new job and a great apartment. And now I am planning a trip to fulfill a lifelong dream of mine to go to Tierra del Fuego. 
I don’t know that I am leaving a trail but I am following my own path.
I changed my blog to be “expat alien, recovering expat on the prairie”. I feel more local now. I recently read “the Art of Stillness” by Pico Iyer. Going nowhere can be a journey in itself. 

Five Hundredth Anniversary of Martin Luther Protest

img_4925

Luther’s table

Five hundred years ago, on October 31, 1517, Martin Luther nailed his Thesis 95 to the door of the Catholic Church in Wittenberg. This document encouraged people to question the teachings of the Catholic church and started the Protestant Reformation. In celebration of the 500th anniversary of this event, there will be exhibits and activities across Germany and the USA. One exhibit is currently showing at the Minneapolis Institute of Art in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Martin Luther was born in Germany in 1483 and died in 1546. He originally studied law but decided to become a monk in 1505. In 1507 he became a priest and in 1510 he walked 1,000 miles to Rome. By 1512 he earned a doctorate in theology and became a professor at Wittenberg. In 1517 he preached against the Catholic Church’s sale of indulgences and nailed his Thesis 95 to the church doors.  This declaration spread quickly across Europe. He was charged with heresy and excommunicated in 1521. That year he came under the protection of Frederick the Wise and translated the New Testament into German. On December 25, 1525, he married an ex-nun and they had six children.

img_4924

The exhibit at the Minneapolis Art Institute is showing through January 15, 2017. It takes you through this life and the times he lived in. There are a couple of beautiful prints by Albrecht Durer, paintings by Lucas Cranach the Elder of Luther and his wife, the last pulpit Luther preached from, original manuscripts, a table Luther worked on, and much more.

pulpit

Among the artifacts is an indulgence chest where gold and other precious items were stored. Any of the faithful could purchase an indulgence in order to reduce the punishment for their sins and shorten the time they had to spend in Purgatory. The way it worked was rich men would lend money to a Cardinal or somebody who oversaw several dioceses. Then the Pope would authorize that person to sell indulgences. The priests would preach several times a day and grant indulgences. With the money collected from the faithful, the debt would be paid off. This is how St Peter’s in Rome was funded.

img_4919

One of the highlights for me was the Gotha Panel Altar from Heinrigh Fullmaurer’s workshop. It has 14 folding panels with a fixed central piece. It is basically a big illustrated bible.

17-_jht-_pesthaube_anagoria

Another item I found interesting was a hood worn by plague doctors. These were not real doctors but people who would go in and help the sick and dying as best they could. Most of these doctors died as well. Martin Luther had two brothers who died of the plague as it spread through Wittenberg in 1527. The hood covered the whole head and shoulders, had round glass eye holes and a pointed beak. The beak was stuffed with herbs and oils that helped the doctor tolerate the stench. It was a very eerie looking thing.

More information on the exhibits and on Martin Luther can be found here.

 

The New World Trade

img_4832

View across to New Jersey

I spent last weekend in New York City with old friends. It was a quick trip centered around a party put on by the high school I went to. We ate and drank most of the time but we did manage to take in a couple of sights. 

The first day we walked down Broadway to Times Square. They were already putting up the barricades and benches for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade. 

img_4915

 

img_4846Our first stop was Cafe Un, Deux, Trois at 123 West 44th Street.  It has been around since 1977 and boasts serving Broadway casts and crew most nights. The food is French bistro and my crepe was yummy. They had salads and sandwiches on the menu as well as lamb, salmon, duck and, of course, real French fries. That night we went to the Yale Club for our party and had cocktails and appetizers. Honesty I didn’t expect it to be such a crowded hopping place. Our party was in the Library so no views, only books. From there we ran across the street to Grand Central Station and had pizza and salad at Naples 45. It was closing at 10:00 pm which we couldn’t believe so we had to eat quickly, Both the drinks and the food were good.

The next day was tourist day.  We had tickets to go up to the top of One World Trade, the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. There is an underground passage that goes under West Street to the new transportation hub and the memorial site. The hub, known as “Oculus” was designed by architect Santiago Calatrava and will connect all the subway lines, ferries and the PATH rail system. It also houses 78,000 square feet of upscale retail and dining.

img_4863

One World Trade

img_4858 img_4853

After ogling the Oculus and taking tons of photos we came out outside and wandered back to One World Trade via the WTC Memorial.

img_4865

WTC Memorial

Inside the One World Trade, we waited in line and went through security and waited in line again and finally made it to the elevators that would take us up 102 floors. At the top we could look down at the Oculus from above.

img_4876

One World Trade is 1776 feet high with 3 million square feet of rentable space. There are 54 high speed elevators and the safety systems exceed the NYC building code. It has exits on all four sides. The elevator on the way up to the observatory showed us a film on the timeline of New York City. It took us less than a minute to climb to 1254 feet in the air. My ears popped all the way. At the top they showed another film and then we were herded to the 360 degree observation deck.

img_4890

That night we had reservations at Palma on Cornelia Street in the West Village. It is a small traditional Italian restaurant that felt very homey and comfortable, beautifully decorated with fresh flowers and candles and a big skylight opened up the night above us.

palma-copy

The food was fabulous.

img_4899

Giant Lamb Chops

img_4898

Chicken ala Milanese

img_4900

Agnolotti agli Spinaci

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next morning it was Dim Sum and off to the airport.

Good Times.

img_4857

 

Lindbergh, Lumber, Military and Mosquitoes

Lindbergh house

Lindbergh house

Charles Lindberg, the Aviator, was born in 1902, and lived in Little Falls, Minnesota until he went to college in 1920. The original house was a three-story mansion built by the river just outside of town. It burned to the ground and was replaced with the more modest two-story building we see today. Charles lived there with his mother. His parents were not on the best of terms so his father had a place in town. In 1931 the 110 acres and the house were donated to the State of Minnesota and the Minnesota Historical Society took over the house and 17 acres. The remaining acres are now the Charles A. Lindbergh State Park.

Lindbergh is most famous for being the first person to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. He did this in 1927. The plane he flew across the Atlantic, the Spirit of St Louis, is on display at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. In 1929, he married the daughter of the US Ambassador to Mexico, Anne Morrow. Their first-born child, Charles A. Lindbergh Jr. was kidnapped and killed in 1932.

A museum containing lots of information about Charles’ life and accomplishments is on the property in Little Falls. There are a couple of good films about his transatlantic voyage and tickertape parades. There are also activities for small children.

Weyerhaeuser and Musser Houses

Weyerhaeuser and Musser Houses

Down the road from the Lindbergh house, there is a small county museum, the Charles A Weyerhaeuser Memorial Museum. It has a few turn of the century artifacts and a genealogy library and research area.

Frederick Weyerhaeuser was a German immigrant who started a lumber business in Rock Island, Illinois in 1858. From there he moved to St Paul, Minnesota. He ended up in a joint venture with James J Hill, also of St Paul. The Weyerhaeuser Timber Company was incorporated in Tacoma, Washington in 1900.

John, Frederick’s oldest son, followed him to become president of the company. In 1935, John’s 8 year old son George, was kidnapped but luckily it ended happy with the child being returned unharmed, and the kidnappers apprehended, unlike the Lindbergh affair. George grew up to be the president of the company. Today Weyerhaeuser is an international public company and per its website is “one of the largest sustainable forest products companies in the world.”

Exhibit at the County Museum

Exhibit at the County Museum

Charles was another son of Frederick’s who was also in the lumber business. He headed the Pine Tree Lumber Company in Little Falls, Minnesota with his business partner Richard Drew Musser. It quickly became the second largest mill in the Northwest. In 1920 the mill closed and all the timber was gone. In the 1930’s the federal and state governments surveyed the area full of stumps. New regulations were implements restricting cutting and demanding re-planting. Most of the trees in Northern Minnesota are now back but the white pine is rare today.

After the mill closed, Charles moved to St Paul and died in 1930. His mansion in Little Falls is now open to the public. The county museum named in his honor does genealogy research.

Jessica Lange also lived in Little Falls when she was about eight years old. You could drive by her school and house if you are so inclined.

P1160642

The Dakota were pushed out of the area by the Ojibwe and then they were pushed out by the Europeans who settled in the area in the early 1800’s. The town is named for a series of rapids that ran on the Mississippi. Today a dam harnesses those rapids.

Mural at A.T. the Black and White

Mural at A.T. the Black and White

There is plenty to see and do in Little Falls. We stayed at the newly built County Inn and Suites and had an excellent meal at the A.T. Black and White, originally built in 1931 and known as the Black and White Hamburger Shop. Today it boasts a Cordon Bleu chef. We had the scallops in citrus beurre with asparagus and risotto and the linguini Alfredo with chicken that was light and flavorful. The evening ended with a brownie sundae with thick chocolate sauce and a touch of caramel.

Camp Ripley Gate

Camp Ripley Gate

About a ten mile drive north of Little Falls is Camp Ripley, a National Guard, 53,000-acre training center. It is named for Fort Ripley, a frontier Army post occupied from 1849-1877 that once sat on the property. The new training site opened in 1931.

IMG_4566

We visited the Minnesota Military Museum at Camp Ripley. We had to drive through huge solid gates and show our ID’s at the gatehouse in order to enter. The museum was close to the main entrance so we didn’t see a lot of the camp. The museum was very well done and quite extensive, I recommend it to anybody interested in history. There were also exhibits on the grounds surrounding the museum and smaller buildings that housed jeeps and other military vehicles. Part of it was interactive. I tried on a couple of helmets (they are heavy).

On the way back to Little Falls we decided to make a circle and swing by the Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. We figured we would just jump out of the car, take a quick walk, take some pictures and be on our way. The Refuge was established in 1992 to preserve a large natural wetland. It is basically a marshland that is home to many species of birds including the sandhill cranes.

Our idea had one small flaw. Mosquitoes. Of course there would be mosquitoes in a marshland and we did know that but we had no idea just how many mosquitoes there would be. Within two minutes we were under full attack and had to run for cover. I was still swatting them in the car when we got back to town.

We consoled ourselves with pizza and beer at Charlie’s Pizza in Little Falls. The next day on the way out of town we stopped at Thielen Meats. John Thielen opened the shop after working for his parents at Thielen Meats in Pierz, fourteen miles east of Little Falls. We originally thought we were going to the market featured in the New York Times but they are all related so no disappointments. Amy Thielen, a chef featured on Food Network, is also related.